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Haply Robotics: Rapid Prototyping With the Fuse 1

calendar_today10/8/2021
schedule1 min read

Dubbed the “PlayStation for Surgeons,” the Haply inverse force-feedback console allows surgeons to simulate operations before they perform them, with the goal of decreasing the risk to patients and improving surgery times.

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By integrating computer science and engineering, robotics shows great promise in the healthcare industry. From disinfecting patient rooms to operating as laboratory assistants, robots can accommodate a wide range of healthcare applications. When it comes to high-stakes medical procedures like surgery, precision is everything. In North America, Medical Related Error accounts for >400,000 deaths every year, making it the 3rd highest source of unnatural death behind cancer and heart disease. How can robotics help? 

At Haply Robotics, a Montreal-based company founded in 2018, robots help surgeons finetune surgical procedures. Haply Robotics is building the next generation of physical simulation consoles to empower more than two million surgeons worldwide to perfect over 260 surgical procedures using state-of-the-art virtual and augmented reality technologies. Dubbed the “PlayStation for Surgeons,” the Haply inverse force-feedback console allows surgeons to simulate operations before they perform them, with the goal of decreasing the risk to patients and improving surgery times.  Haply Robotics brought 3D printing in-house for rapid prototyping, deploying FDM, SLA, and SLS 3D printing across their projects. In this post, we learn how Haply Robotics has used various 3D printing technologies, and why they purchased a Fuse 1.

Starting the Collaboration with Developing Ventilators for COVID-19

Felix Desourdy, head of mechanical engineering at Haply Robotics, said that he met Colin Gallacher and Steve Ding co-founders of Haply Robotics, in 2018. “We met at the National Research Council of Canada where we were working on a team doing where we were doing haptic development for medical surgery simulation. We were all fans of the new era of being able to design something and quickly iterate on it and be able to just do prototype after prototype to generate the perfect idea of what we want to do.”

In 2020, the team had a major collaboration with the government of Canada put on hold and decided to put their design and robotics skills to use by entering the CODE LiFE Ventilator Challenge—a call for device firms to design a low-cost, simple, easy-to-use, and easy-to-build ventilator that could serve patients suffering from COVID-19.